classroom technology grant

Technology isn't the problem with education in America; it's equity and relevance. Forty-five million kids, mainly urban and metropolitan students, have access to technology. Why do huge gaps still exist in educational outcomes, high school graduation rates, college readiness, and workforce advancements based on race, class, and geography? Gaps also exist between high-performing and low-performing public schools based on differences in access to funding, resources, and the ability and willingness of district and school leaders to embrace individual schools, communities, and classrooms. ​

 

In recent years all districts have adopted technology to align with the new age digital student. Technology has become ubiquitous in our daily lives and affordable even to our public schools. This is great, but it has led to a digital learning gap. The Digital Learning Gap is caused by differences in how Americans in and out of school access and use technology to improve learning opportunities and outcomes. Teachers using the latest technology, but importantly the most relevant technology, generate additional student interest and pique students' interest who are typically disengaged in school. Heightened student interest also increases the level and amount of student engagement, opening the door to more significant learning experiences and opportunities. Technology is not just devices; it's programs and developments that make the classroom more practical for your specific student body.

The Leaders To Learners technology grant will allow black male educators to bridge the gap between their students' technological needs and wants. Unfortunately, specificity and individuality are not components of the one size fits all education system that believes equality and equity are interchangeable. The technology grant would allow teachers to provide and integrate technology into their lessons individually. Who knows what their specific students need more than the teacher who is in the class with them daily?